Tag Archives: Nintendo 3DS XL

LBX: Little Battlers eXperience Review

I find myself pretty well versed in kids anime shows, and yet I had never heard of LBX before the game graced my 3DS. Seeing LEVEL-5 as the developer then isn't surprising since they seem to have a firm grasp on either adapting more obscure anime titles into video games, or generally produce original titles with gorgeous anime visuals.

The premise around LBX (Little Battlers eXperience) revolves around Van and his friends, and their adventures with their LBX toys that are used to duel one another. Van's father created a powerful LBX prototype, that could either bring hope or despair to the world, depending on who gets their hands on it. Van's father disappears in what looks like a plane crash and then ends up with his prototype while on the run from the evil goons who want to get their hands on it. It's a silly enough story, especially when you consider the fact that these little toys are basically the equivalent of Yu-Gi-Oh! cards in this world, and yet they're somehow also powerful tools of destruction. But hey, I saw Small Soldiers, so I get it.

As you progress through the story, you'll continually unlock new LBX parts, of which there are over 130 full sets, that you can then mix and match depending on your playstyle. That's like being able to catch over 130 different Pokemon and then mixing and matching their body parts to create the ultimate supreme being with the perfect stats and skills. That analogy didn't really work, but you get it. You'll also get access to various weaponry that changes how your LBX attacks and functions during battle.

So the question is, do you invest in the new robot-part-collecting crazy that is LBX, even if you haven't ever heard of the show? Let's check it out.

The Positives / The Negatives

The Verdict

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Return to PopoloCrois: A STORY OF SEASONS Fairytale Review

Speaking truthfully, the core Harvest Moon or the new Story of Seasons games have never really caught my attention. I always craved just a bit more than the simple life. For me, the Rune Factory games were a much better alternative, since they provided me with a great sense of accomplishment in two ways; Farming and battling.

I see the appeal of constantly improving your farmland, but, for me at least, that core mechanic isn't enough to satisfy me for a long period of time. Thus, I was happy to find out that the next Story of Seasons would be joining with PopoloCrois, for a sequel to the PSP game which also incorporates a ton of farming gameplay.

But did the merger of these two completely separate franchises make for a good game? Let's find out.

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Final Fantasy Explorers Review

I'm a pretty big fan of the "Monster Hunter" formula. It has proven to work as a pick-up-and-play format for portable titles, and even for extended play sessions on consoles. They're games which require a lot of grind in order to attain that armor set you've been eyeing, or that weapon that has a higher attack value than your current one.

Final Fantasy Explorers is very much falls into the genre of "MH" clones. You create a character, you set out to rid the land of beasts, and collect precious resources in order to continually advance your gear. But Explorers has that Final Fantasy flair that makes it distinctly Final Fantasy. For one, you have a long list of Jobs you can freely switch, Eidolons to fight and capture, and even play briefly as famous characters like Cloud, Squall and Terra.

But even though Final Fantasy Explorers sounds like a dream combo for those that enjoy both the FF and the MH franchises, it never executes properly on either. Let's take a look at what works, and what Explorers doesn't fully deliver on.

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Humble bundles $179 worth of Wii U and 3DS games for $13

The folks over at Humble have brought a Nintendo Bundle that brings together a number of Nintendo's third-party publishers together and makes their games available at a discount. The 'Friends of Nintendo' bundle is worth $179, but thanks to Humble we can get all of the games, as well as unannounced titles for $13.

As per usual, the bundle supports two different charities. This time, a portion of the proceeds wil go towards SOS Children's Villages and Code.org.  Of course, you choose where the proceeds go – how much goes to the developers and how much goes to the charities.

Here are the games included:

The $1 category

  • Retro City Rampage: DX (Wii U)
  • Affordable Space Adventures (Wii U)
  • Shantae and the Pirate's Curse (Wii U/3DS)

The above average category (currently $9.57)

  • Freedom Planet (Wii U)
  • Rhythm Thief & the Emporer's Treasure (3DS)
  • Citizens of Earth (Wii U or 3DS)
  • Retro City Rampage: DX 3DS Home Menu Theme
  • More games coming soon!

The $13 category

  • Super Street Fighter IV: 3D Edotopm (3DS)
  • Darksiders 2 (Wii U)

Mega Man Legacy Collection 3DS Review

Six months ago, console and PC fans were treated to a six-game collection of the original NES Mega Man games. You know, the ones you might have played as a kid, that strengthened your resolve and made you the amazing gamer you are today. Or, on the flipside, made you rage at your NES, resulting in thrown controllers and NES carts. Whatever childhood memories you have of Mega Man, there's no denying that it took the platforming world by storm with an intense difficulty, and some kickass music.

Now, fans have the ability to relive those glory days with the Mega Man Legacy Collection on the Nintendo 3DS. The original 6 NES games are included, exactly like you remembered them, down to their pixel-perfect platforming elements. But what makes this collection even more enticing, at least for those who love all things Mega Man, is the database chock full of concept art and other interesting tidbits.

Click the link below for the original review of Mega Man Collection, which covers most of what you can find in the 3DS version, as they're nearly identical games.

Mega Man Legacy Collection Review

As for what's new in the 3DS version, not much, but it does have some unique content.

The biggest addition is the game's challenge mode, that's only accessible via the Mega Man amiibo. Unless you were lucky to snag yourself one of those, or you're planning to buy the Special Edition of the game which comes with a Golden Mega Man amiibo, you'll be locked out of these. While I wouldn't say that's a deal breaker by any means, even though the challenges are super fun, and also super hard, it's a pretty bad practice to lock content out like this behind a hard to get amiibo. I'm going to guess that since the amiibo is currently selling for over $40 on Amazon, that it's probably a little hard to obtain. Also, the fact that the amiibo does nothing else but unlock that content, makes the utilization of said amiibo rather lackluster.

But if you do happen to unlock the Challenge Mode, prepare your reflexes. Seriously. These are some intensely hard challenges. One of my favorites was the jump challenge, which had you going through multiple stages, carefully hopping from one platform to the next as you try to dodge incoming fire, and also dodge enemies. It's tough. There's also a boss gauntlet challenge, which, well, if you beat it, then I salute you.

The other minor change is that the game's Museum Mode, the one filled with a ton of concept art, sketches, and official art for all the games, got a bit beefed up with even more content. However, I will say that viewing the Museum content on your 3DS versus your monitor or TV doesn't translate as well. The screen is just too small to really enjoy everything it has to offer.

But if you're getting it to have all six original NES games in one, convenient location, then the Legacy Collection is still very much worth a buy. Like I said in my original review, it does seem like a step back from the Anniversary Collection which released over a decade ago that had a lot more Mega Man to offer, in the form of eight core games and both Power Battle games, but hey, at $14.99 for the digital version, you're still six really quality games.

Dragon Ball Z: Extreme Butoden Review

If you were computer-savvy by the mid-1990s, chances are you stumbled upon the wonderful world of Emulators. These programs were built to emulate consoles on your PC, which meant you could play games from systems like the NES, SNES, Gameboy and Genesis, directly from your computer. Of course, downloading these and playing them was illegal unless you owned the actual physical disc (like that stopped any of you though).

It was thanks to the SNES emulators that I was able to discover some pretty decent Dragon Ball Z games that we never got to play here in the US. Three of them in fact. Dragon Ball Z Super Butoden 1, 2 and 3 were all 2D fighters that had some impressive mechanics. And even though they were in 2D, they were leagues better than that garbage Dragon Ball GT: Final Bout game we got on the original PlayStation in 1997.

It's perhaps thanks to the original Super Butoden games where my fondness for Extreme Butoden on the 3DS stems from. After all, Dragon Ball Z: Extreme Butoden is essentially a sequel to those games, mechanically and aesthetically. But does its gameplay hold up?

Let's find out.

The Positives / The Negatives

The Verdict

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Fire Emblem Fates Review

My first real exposure to the Fire Emblem series was through 2013's Fire Emblem Awakening. As I've learned much later, Awakening was a lot different from its predecessors, opting for a lot more streamlined gameplay and simplified gameplay elements. Fates continues this tradition, sure, but it does add some more complex layers and mechanics that make it seem like an evolution of the previous game.

Fates is unique in the way it's presented. Instead of one core game, we essentially have three, that branch out after a certain chapter in the game, giving the player a choice of which of the two factions to side with; Your birth family who you were taken from at a young age, the family you've known your whole life that raised you, or siding with neither and starting your own. Currently, those who buy the Special Edition of the game are the only ones who can access the third campaign, and the rest will be able to get their hands on it March 10. Though that is the perfect amount of time for players to go through either one, or both of the choices.

I'm thankful that Nintendo was kind enough to send me over the Special Edition which allowed to get a feel for all three of the included campaigns.

Let's take a look at what makes this next entry in the Fire Emblem series great, what falls flat, and our final verdict

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Chibi-Robo! Zip Lash Review

Nintendo's latest 3DS software release, Chibi-Robo! Zip Lash, is the latest in an IP which began on the GameCube almost a decade ago. The protagonist, Chibi-Robo, is a small little robot created by Citrusoft to clean up and do all the tedious jobs humans don't want to spend the time on – all without being seen. In this latest adventure, the charming little cleaner is cleaning a space craft when discovering there's something strange happening back on Earth; aliens are taking various resources from Earth, and no one knows exactly why!

This quirky 2D platformer has potential to be a unique experience, what with the inclusion of the “Zip Lash” mechanic and focus on a less-than-normal Nintendo character (well, technically Chibi Robo has been around for almost a decade, so there's nothing really new). Does this charming little robot have what it takes to make a stand-out title?

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Hatsune Miku: Project Mirai DX Review

Hatsune Miku has been slowly creeping her way into my heart with her releases on the PS3 and Vita, finally letting me experience the rhythm based challenging gameplay that Japanese players have been playing for years prior. Up until now though, at least in the US, Miku was only available on Sony consoles, though with her latest release, Hatsune Miku: Project Mirai DX, she finally makes her debut on Nintendo's handheld, the 3DS.

For those that never experienced the greatness of the Miku series, it's a rhythm game filled with original songs featuring various Vocaloids including Hatsune Miku and others, which tasks players to press buttons corresponding with the button prompts on screen.

The 3DS version is, for the most part, similar to Sony's counterpart, although now all the Vocaloids have been Chibi-fied to look like Nendoroids, so they're all stubby and adorable. However, there is a ton more to do in Project Mirai DX outside of performing some awesome Japanese songs. It's once again a Tamagotchi of sorts which has you picking a girl and checking up on her, buying her things to keep her happy, playing games with her and even giving her some spending allowance. You can also play some games of Puyo Puyo, and Reversi. There are also numerous shops to buy items and accessories, as well as furniture for your Vocaloid's apartment. And a Miku game would be incomplete without a dance studio which lets you create and customize dance routines.

It's surprisingly brimming with content that will more or less keep you engaged even outside of the 40+ songs.

So how does it compare to the original Hatsune Miku games? Is it better? Should you buy into it? Check out what's good, what's not, and our final verdict.

The Positives / The Negatives

The Verdict

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Pokemon Trading Card Game Online is being ported to Android

Android users are probably used to waiting a little longer for some things, but when it comes to Pokemon's Online Trading Card Game, the word "waiting" doesn't even suffice.

Pokemon Trading Card Game Online was released on iPad platform at the tail-end of 2014, a move that left many Android users wondering when, or even if, the game was going to be available for them to play. 

However, now they do have the answer they've been looking for. The Pokemon Company has launched a beta test for their Pokemon Trading Card Game Online, for Android tablets. 

So, it looks like those using Android won't have to wait much longer before they can catch'em all. In the meantime, check out our Top 5 most Underrated Pokemon, because you never know, it could make for some good scouting before you get the game!

Also if you would like to check out the beta on the Google Play Store, you can do so by clicking here.

[GooglePlay]